The early 1500's, mid-Renaissance, was in many ways the beginning of knowing the body through dissection, i.e. anatomy (literally: to cut up). The work of Andreas Vesalius, oft' referred to as the father of modern anatomy, as his contemporaries, like this anatomist, Juan Valverde de Amusco, who made this artful rendition of man comtemplating himself from outside. I was the student, again, of this episode's guest all last week in AZ in a fresh-tissue cadaver dissection.

The early 1500's, mid-Renaissance, was in many ways the beginning of knowing the body through dissection, i.e. anatomy (literally: to cut up). The work of Andreas Vesalius, oft' referred to as the father of modern anatomy, as his contemporaries, like this anatomist, Juan Valverde de Amusco, who made this artful rendition of man comtemplating himself from outside. I was the student, again, of this episode's guest all last week in AZ in a fresh-tissue cadaver dissection.

By popular demand, and my own great interest, Tom Myers returns to The Body Awake for a second interview.

In this second round — see episode 5 for the first — we cover:

  • the nature of fascia as the body's very under-mapped "biomechanical autoregulatory system" 
  • how "you" could be seen as a vessel for your digestive system to get around (at 36 min)
  • do we know what "trauma is stored in the body" means? what is memory? (at 39 min)
  • Tom's story of his own birth, and experiencing liberation from a traumatic event many, many years later (50 min)
  • a look into Tom's 1-on-1 work as a bodywork practitioner (this was of particular interest to me)
  • even a PG-13 Robin William's joke you can tell at your next cocktail party (at 35 min, 20 sec)

Listen on the top of this page, or Download direct or Listen on iTunes

SHOW NOTES

Anatomy Trains, Tom's main website

In vivo videos from French hand surgeon Jean-Claude Guimberteau

Sign up for the Fascial Dissection Lab for Feb 2018